397 free documentaries and films to watch online
11
Fev 12

 

John Pilger investigates how product marketing techniques used in advertising are applied to politics, specifically the US Presidential campaign in the mid- 1970s. In doing so he uncovers the spin doctors at work and witnesses how they can make less-than deserving presidential candidates into frontrunners through reworking their public image.

 

 

 

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06
Jan 11
By Malandro, às 16:09link do post | Leave a Comment

 

'The War You Don't See' is a powerful and timely investigation into the media's role in war, tracing the history of 'embedded' and independent reporting from the carnage of World War One to the destruction of Hiroshima, and from the invasion of Vietnam to the current war in Afghanistan and disaster in Iraq. As weapons and propaganda become even more sophisticated, the nature of war is developing into an 'electronic battlefield' in which journalists play a key role, and civilians are the victims.

 

Includes an interview with WikiLeaks founder and editor-in-chief Julian Assange.

 

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01
Nov 10
By Malandro, às 10:43link do post | Leave a Comment

 

John Pilger's 1983 film about the small nation of Nicaragua and its right to survive investigates the corruption in Central America. In 1979, the Sandinistas won a popular revolution in Nicaragua, putting an end to decades of the corrupt US-backed Somoza dictatorship. They based their reformist ideology on that of the English Co-operative Movement, but was to prove too ‘radical’ for the Reagan administration.

 

In this film, Pilger describes the achievements of the Sandinistas and their "threat of a good example".

 

 

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10
Jun 09
By Malandro, às 17:20link do post | Leave a Comment

 

With the run-up to the Sydney olympics, John Pilger and Alan Lowery take a studied look behind the hype and glamour surrounding the games. Australia’s Aborigines remain excluded, impoverished and mistreated - while their part in the brilliant history of Australia’s sporting success disgracefully goes virtually unrecognized.

 


31
Mai 09
By Malandro, às 22:38link do post | Leave a Comment

 

John Pilger vividly reveals the brutality and murderous political ambitions of the Pol Pot / Khmer Rouge totalitarian regime which bought genocide and despair to the people of Cambodia while neighboring countries, including Australia, shamefully ignored the immense human suffering and unspeakable crimes that bloodied this once beautiful country.

 

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26
Mai 09
By Malandro, às 23:49link do post | Leave a Comment

 

 

In a series of extraordinary interviews with both Palestinians and Israelis, John Pilger weaves together the issue of Palestine. He speaks to the families of suicide bombers and their victims; he sees the humiliation of Palestinians imposed on them at myriad checkpoints and with a permit system not dissimilar to apartheid South Africa's infamous pass laws. He goes into the refugee camps and meets children who, he says, "no longer dream like other children, or if they do, it is about death."

 


By Malandro, às 23:36link do post | Leave a Comment

 

STEALING A NATION (John Pilger, 2004) is an extraordinary film about the plight of people of the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean - secretly and brutally expelled from their homeland by British governments in the late 1960s and early 1970s, to make way for an American military base. The base, on the main island of Diego Garcia, was a launch pad for the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. Stealing a Nation has won both the Royal Television Society's top award as Britain's best documentary in 2004-5, and a 'Chris Award' at the Columbus International Film and Video Festival.

 


By Malandro, às 17:15link do post | Leave a Comment

 

Award-winning journalist, John Pilger, investigates the realities of globalization by taking a close look at Indonesia. In order to examine the true effects of globalization, Pilger turns the spotlight on Indonesia, a country described by the World Bank as a model pupil until its globalized economy collapsed in 1998.

 

The film examines the use of sweatshop factories by famous brand names, and asks some penetrating questions. Who are the real beneficiaries of the globalized economy? Who really rules the world now? Is it governments or a handful of huge companies? The Ford Motor Company alone is bigger than the economy of South Africa. Enormously rich men, like Bill Gates, have a wealth greater than all of Africa. Pilger goes behind the hype of the new global economy and reveals that the divisions between the rich and poor have never been greater.

 

 (Legendado em Português: por Malandro)

 


By Malandro, às 17:13link do post | Leave a Comment

 

After Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, the United Nations (backed strongly by the US and UK) imposed harsh sanctions on Iraq that lasted for 10 years (1991-2001); the harsh restrictions on imports of everything, including access to key medicines, resulted in over a million deaths, more than half a million of which were women and children. That's more deaths than the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan and 9/11 combined. The purpose was regime change, but it never came.

 

The overwhelming majority of those killed were the poor, elderly, women and children. Empirically, sanctions overwhelmingly punish the poor, the destitute. While the sanctions were in place, the richest people in control of the resources (Saddam Hussein et al.) still had everything they wanted: food, cars, mansions, access to the best medicines, etc. Award-winning journalist John Pilger has documented the reality of UN harsh sanctions in this hard-hitting film.

 


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